Greening of the Arctic: An IPY Initiative

Yamal landscape between Kharasaveya and Maare Sale. Photographer: Skip Walker, 2008.

2008 Expedition to the Yamal Peninsula, Russia; Yamal landscape between Kharasaveya and Maare Sale. Photographer: Skip Walker
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The Greening of the Arctic (GOA) IPY initiative is comprised of four projects each contributing to documenting, mapping and understanding the rapid and dramatic changes to terrestrial vegetation expected across the circumpolar Arctic as a result of a changing climate.

Recent publications and awards

Environmental Research Letters, Focus Issue: Focus on Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Vegetation.
Guest editors: Howard E. Epstein, University of Virginia; Donald (Skip) A. Walker, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Isla Myers-Smith, University of Alberta.
The articles in this collection were selected for their presentation of outstanding research, receipt of the highest praise from our international referees and the highest number of downloads last year.

Topp, R. 2012. The Changing Arctic. UA Museum of the North (movie).

Arctic land is greening, says scientist, Program #5733 of the Earth & Sky Radio Series. Aired 05-March-2009. Listen to the MP3.

Greening of the Arctic project featured on the IPY website, February 17

International Polar Year (IPY)

The International Polar Year is a large scientific programme focused on the Arctic and the Antarctic from March 2007 to March 2009. IPY is organized through the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and involves over 200 projects, with thousands of scientists from over 60 nations examining a wide range of polar physical, biological and social research topics.

More information on the International Polar Year 2007 - 2009

GoA Component Projects:

The Greening of the Arctic initiative consists of a group of scientists who are associated with the one or more of the four major components that contribute to documenting, mapping and understanding the rapid and dramatic changes to terrestrial vegetation expected across the circumpolar Arctic as a result of a changing climate.